Timeless Tunesday: {Where is Thumbkin?}

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Timeless Tunesday is brought to you by one of my favorite mother goose rhymes! But seriously, it started as a rhyme, then Barney adapted it and sang it to the tune of Frere Jacques. I received a cassette tape of Barney in Concert which features this song, for my 4th birthday. I am not ashamed to say I still have it today, despite the fact that I have no tape player. The song is a fantastic way to engage children in finger play and imitation. In the past, I’ve used this activity for group music sessions, but recently, started using it to address fine motor and upper body strength goals with an occupational therapist for a 1:1 client (yay for co-treating!).  To adapt the activity, I held my guitar up in the air, and for each verse that “finger” strummed the guitar chords.

Where is Thumbkin, Where is Thumbkin (hide hands behind your back)

Here I am, Here I am (bring right hand around, then left hand)

Play my guitar, Play like me (OT strums guitar to demonstrate, then client uses the thumb to imitate)

Come and play, play the guitar

Repeat this each time with pointer, tall man, ring, and pinky fingers.

Save The Date: {March 8, 2014} GRAND OPENING!

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Friends. We are SO excited to finally have a couple of dedicated rooms in our own clinic space to meet with clients 1:1, groups, and to collaborate with other allied health professionals to serve the Minneapolis and greater metro area! Please save the date and join us on Saturday, March 8th from 1-4pm. You will be able to sign up for Musical Playgound (5+ yo Social Skills Group) and Tones of Fun (0-5yo Caregiver & Me Music Class) for the spring. Of course, we will also have treats and be raffling off some Toneworks Swag, instruments, & giftcards for services!

See you there!

Andrea & Lyndie

{Top 5 in 2013}

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Happy New Year’s Eve! It’s hard to believe that our first full year as Toneworks Music Therapy Services LLC. and as a blog is coming to a close. I thought it would be fun to take a look back at our most popular posts in 2013.

5. Alphabet Soup

Great for a food theme and pre-reading skills, sing along to find letters in the soup. Students will work on letter identification, self-regulation, and matching.

4. Move Your Scarves Everybody

An energetic song to get everybody up and moving with a scarf. Movements in the song are designed to work on gross motor goals such as crossing mid-line and bilateral coordination. All of our young and old clients love this song!

3. Valentine’s Bingo

Unfortunately, wikifonia is now part of musescore so while the links aren’t active, the bingo board is still there for Valentine’s day in a couple of months! Clients work on empathy, listening, sharing, and peer interaction during this fun musical game.

2. Brown Bear, Brown Bear

Whoever thought of singing the book, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, to the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle is a genius. Combining the familiar book and tune captures the imaginations of our students as we work on color identification, matching, imitating gross motor movements of the animals, and turn taking during the singable book.

1. Rhythm Games: Part 1

It’s hard to find interventions for school age or middle school clients that are age appropriate. In this post, you will find two rhythm games that are perfect for groups to practice working together, turn taking, sound location, and appropriate touch.

Thank you all for taking time to read our blog posts and comment as well! Happy New Year from Ms. Andrea & Ms. Lyndie.

Monday Music and Movement: {Five Little Ducks}

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One of the ways I like to mix up my individual therapy sessions is to try new spins on client’s favorite songs and activities. During our recent trip to the AMTA national conference, Andrea and I had the chance to experiment with a lot of new instruments, and one of my personal favorites that just arrived are the quack sticks. They look very similar to colored egg maracas, but they make the sound of a duck instead. I have been wanting to experiment with making a gross motor activity using the song 5 Little Ducks for a client of mine that is working on imitation, attention-to-task, and following 2-step directions. In order to make this intervention successful for his diagnosis, the activity had to have a plenty of sensory input, opportunities for body movement, and lots of structure.

For my intervention, I began by attaching velcro weighted “web” feet to my client’s ankles to provide proprioceptive input and help him become aware of his body in space. Together, we lined up  3-5 color dot mats on the floor that make a path to our “hill”, which is a medium slide that requires him to climb 5 steps before sliding down. Next, we put two quack sticks at the bottom of the slide, and make one more path of 3-5  dot mats. At the end of the path, there are 5 beanie ducks (or visuals of ducks) and each time through, a duck is removed.

After a big “Ready, Set, GO!” I begin playing on the guitar and singing:

Five little ducks went out one day (begin on the first dot and walk to the next one until reaching the slide)

Over the hills and far away (climb up the steps and slide down)

Momma duck said, quack quack quack quack (grab quack sticks and shake)

But only four little ducks came back. (walk from dot to dot until you reach the ducks and remove one)

Continue until you have counted down to zero.

*Note: I have done several specific things just for this client, such as using the webbed feet with ankle weights, a slide as the “hill”, and colored dots on steps of different heights. Some days, when the weighted feet don’t provide enough input, I also give him a backpack of weighted beanie ducks to carry as well. After he makes it through the course each time, he takes one duck out of the backpack and leaves it on the ocean drum “pond”. You can adjust and adapt as you need or see fit.

Happy Quacking!