New Website for Toneworks!

Hello All!

We have a new website for Toneworks. We’d love it if you bookmark it: http://www.toneworksmusictherapy.com! We will have an automatic redirect up over the weekend so you won’t have a choice anyways. But, feel free to go on over and check it out.

Thanks,

Andrea & Lyndie

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Timeless Tunesday: {It Is Winter}

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I know some readers are in warm weather…but it’s been quite the winter in MN so far. As a result, it’s still appropriate for teachers to plan “Snow” as the theme of the month and for me to create this movement song with scarves! I set the words to the tune of “London Bridge”. During this music therapy intervention students can work on imitation, gross motor movement, including crossing midline, and use expressive language.

Pass out the scarves and sing to the tune of London Bridge:

Snow is falling to the ground (move scarves up and down or toss and catch)

To the ground, to the ground

Snow is falling to the ground 

It is Winter, Brrrr (rub arms & shiver)

Brush it off so we can play (sweep the floor from side to side)

We can play, we can play

Brush it off so we can play

It is Winter, Brrrr

Squish it up into a snowball (use both hands to squish scarf into a ball)

Into a snowball, into a snowball

Squish it up into a snowball

It is Winter, Brrr

Cover up and stay so warm (use the scarf like a blanket on lap and tap knees)

Stay so warm, stay so warm

Cover up and stay so warm

It is Winter, Brrr

Such a simple melody, but you can encourage so much movement and language with the added sensory stimulation of scarves on top of the music and movement. If it’s still cold in your area, I hope you can use this intervention!

Save The Date: {March 8, 2014} GRAND OPENING!

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Friends. We are SO excited to finally have a couple of dedicated rooms in our own clinic space to meet with clients 1:1, groups, and to collaborate with other allied health professionals to serve the Minneapolis and greater metro area! Please save the date and join us on Saturday, March 8th from 1-4pm. You will be able to sign up for Musical Playgound (5+ yo Social Skills Group) and Tones of Fun (0-5yo Caregiver & Me Music Class) for the spring. Of course, we will also have treats and be raffling off some Toneworks Swag, instruments, & giftcards for services!

See you there!

Andrea & Lyndie

Valentine’s Day {Music Bingo} for TEENS!

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I just started a spring semester run working at a transition program with 18-21 year olds with varying diagnoses and abilities. Finding age appropriate music therapy interventions can be hard for this population, especially for higher functioning young adults. The group loved playing music bingo with a name that tune twist so I wanted to share the board here!

Pass out the bingo sheets and explain that you’ll be playing and/or singing the melody (without words) until one person guesses the answer. Then, ask everyone to mark the box and go through one verse/chorus or whatever you have time to sing. Goals for this intervention include social skills so I encourage talking among the group to figure out the answer or to share a particular fact or memory about the song. I’ve uploaded the sheet as a doc in case you want to switch out songs or make different versions for several teams.

Happy Valentine’s Week!

Friday Favorites: {In the Winter…}

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Maybe you have heard of this whole Polar Vortex phenomenon? Well, in MN we are enjoying what some are calling, Polar Vortex 2.0. Basically, this means a lot of days that never make it above 0 degrees! All of us Minnesnowtans are keeping warm with hot food and hot drink so here’s a fun song writing activity about hot yummy things to eat in the cold, cold winter.

Just like our song about what we like to eat, “In the Summer”, this song writing intervention uses the melody of “The Lion Sleeps Tonight”. I looked through cooking magazines, cut out photos of warm food and drink (hot chocolate, pasta, soup, etc.), and laminated them for visuals. I find that good quality visuals always go a long way in getting clients engaged and it’s worth a little bit of time spent in preparation. Clients young and old will get to make choices, recognize names, practice joint attention, interact with peers, and work on sequencing during this song.

Start singing/playing the chorus of the song…

In the winter, the cold, cold winter

We like to stay very warm

In the winter, the cold, cold winter

We like to eat lots of warm food

Now the clients get to make a choice during the verse and put their food next to their name on the board

In the winter, the cold, cold winter

__(name)__ likes to eat lots of __(food__

In the winter, the cold, cold winter

__(name)__ likes to eat lots of  __(food)__

Then everyone can join back in for the “a-wim-o-weh” part.

This intervention would also be a great opportunity to bring in more senses such as touch, smell, and taste of the different foods and discussing hot/cold as well. We hope you’re staying warm and can use this song with your clients!

Guest Post by Dena Register: {Declaring Our Independence}

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Below is a guest post written by Dena Register of the Regulatory Affairs Advisor, Certification Board for Music Therapists on finding our voice as music therapists during #mtadvocacy month. Enjoy! 

The end of the year always brings with it a great deal of reflection. It feels good to look at the accomplishments of the year at its close, set new intentions and imagine new heights for the year ahead. My own professional reflections for this year brought the realization that over the last eighteen years I have enjoyed a rather diverse career in music therapy with roles as a clinician, educator, consultant and professional advocate. One of the most interesting components of wearing so many different “hats” is trying to imagine how those you are working with perceive music therapy.

There is a constant effort to try and imagine how I can best help others understand what music therapy is and the many benefits for our clients. I feel the need to have an analogy for every situation, description, and population. I can’t imagine that I’m alone in this challenge. I know many music therapists that adapt in this chameleon-like fashion when it comes to how we describe our life’s work. We build rapport with our various audiences by searching for some common ground or understanding to use as a point of departure in hopes that they will have that magical “A-ha!” about the many benefits of music therapy. While these experiences help us develop remarkable skills in story sharing and empathy, we are constantly altering the description of our professional identity in order to help others understand us. This task is a complex one for professionals and is one of the challenges that both students and new professionals find difficult to navigate early on in their careers.

I get to teach a class in philosophy and theory of music therapy. Over the last several offerings of this course the students and I have spent hours exploring what music therapy has in common with other therapeutic and creative arts professions. Each semester produces fascinating discussions, diagrams and reflections on the shared aspects of our professions and, more importantly, how music therapy is notably distinct from any other profession or practice. Successful participation in our profession is reliant upon years of skilled musicianship, and a balance of both scientific and artistic knowledge and understanding. It is highly unlikely that an individual who does not have any prior musical training can make their way through varied and rigorous coursework of a music therapy degree and successfully complete the academic, clinical and musical requirements needed.

In the sixty-plus year development of our profession we have learned to be both flexible and savvy in our descriptions of music therapy. These well-honed skills have built a foundation for our profession to grow and expand in ways we didn’t think possible.  And, in most recent years, our advocacy efforts have brought us to a place of greater acknowledgement and public awareness than we have ever experienced before. What comes next? It is the era of INDEPENDENCE.

With an increased focus on research about the numerous impacts of music as a therapeutic medium, greater access to quality services by licensed professionals and continuously growing clinical offerings music therapy is positioned for continued, exponential growth. Now is the time for continued clarification to others regarding who we are as a profession as well as our unique qualifications.  In 2014, it is imperative that we declare I am a music therapist and understand how to articulate our unique qualifications and distinctions from our other therapeutic partners.  How will YOU celebrate your ‘independence’ this year?

About the Author: Dr. Dena Register is the Regulatory Affairs Advisor for the Certification Board for Music Therapists and an Associate Professor of Music Therapy at the University of Kansas. She can be reached at dregister@cbmt.org

{Top 5 in 2013}

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Happy New Year’s Eve! It’s hard to believe that our first full year as Toneworks Music Therapy Services LLC. and as a blog is coming to a close. I thought it would be fun to take a look back at our most popular posts in 2013.

5. Alphabet Soup

Great for a food theme and pre-reading skills, sing along to find letters in the soup. Students will work on letter identification, self-regulation, and matching.

4. Move Your Scarves Everybody

An energetic song to get everybody up and moving with a scarf. Movements in the song are designed to work on gross motor goals such as crossing mid-line and bilateral coordination. All of our young and old clients love this song!

3. Valentine’s Bingo

Unfortunately, wikifonia is now part of musescore so while the links aren’t active, the bingo board is still there for Valentine’s day in a couple of months! Clients work on empathy, listening, sharing, and peer interaction during this fun musical game.

2. Brown Bear, Brown Bear

Whoever thought of singing the book, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, to the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle is a genius. Combining the familiar book and tune captures the imaginations of our students as we work on color identification, matching, imitating gross motor movements of the animals, and turn taking during the singable book.

1. Rhythm Games: Part 1

It’s hard to find interventions for school age or middle school clients that are age appropriate. In this post, you will find two rhythm games that are perfect for groups to practice working together, turn taking, sound location, and appropriate touch.

Thank you all for taking time to read our blog posts and comment as well! Happy New Year from Ms. Andrea & Ms. Lyndie.